Exhibition 2018-04-11T14:33:09+00:00
The exhibition – consisting of over fifty masterpieces borrowed from leading Italian and international museums –  including but not limited to Pinacoteca di Brera in Milan, Galleria Borghese in Rome, and Museo del Prado in Madrid – hinges upon the great Venetian painter Titian and the two key works-of-art he painted in Brescia: the Polyptych commissioned by Bishop Altobello Averoldi between 1520 and 1522 for the collegiate church of Santi Nazaro and Celso, and the three canvases
with Allegories of Brescia, painted by Titian many years later, in the sixties of the 16th century, for the Salone della Loggia,  and destroyed by a fire in 1575.
This exhibition aims to revisit the echo of Titian’s art among the leading Brescian painters of his time, i.e. Girolamo Romanino, Moretto, and Giovan Girolamo Savoldo, while recounting the events leading up to the decoration and expansion projects of Palazzo della Loggia, in which also Andrea Palladio was involved.
The familiarity of the Brescian artists with Titian and the Venetian environment does not only concern their artistic style, but it is also significantly corroborated by the same type of representation, particularly in paintings for private devotion.
Divided into 6 sections, the exhibition highlights Titian’s influence on the development of Brescian painting. Through a sequence of close comparisons, it illustrates the extent to which Titian’s colour studies were actually interpreted by leading local painters.

Brescia and Venice in the 16th century: crossed paths

The exhibition will be introduced by a section focused on setting the historical-cultural context in which Titian’s work in Brescia took place and illustrating the strong relationship between Venice and Brescia since when, in 1426, Brescia went under the political rule of Venice.

FIRST SECTION
The Training of Moretto and Romanino and Titian’s Example

Girolamo Romanino’s training, which began at the end of the first decade of the 16th century, as well as that of Alessandro Bonvicino, a.k.a. il Moretto, which began some time later, proceeded through a constant dialogue with Titian’s works-of-art, and was significantly affected by the time the two artists had spent in Venice when young. Therefore, in this section some important paintings by a young Titian, from Museo del Prado and Accademia Carrara will be compared with the works of Romanino and Moretto.

SECOND SECTION
Around Titian’s Averoldi Polyptych and His Heritage

The section centered on the Averoldi polyptych offers an opportunity to properly appreciate Titian’s masterpiece, kept in the collegiate church of Santi Nazaro and Celso. It aims to revisit the echo of Titian’s art among the leading Brescian painters of his time, i.e. Girolamo Romanino, Moretto, and Giovan Girolamo Savoldo, who could not but measure themselves against Titian’s model.

The polyptych commissioned by Bishop Altobello Averoldi between 1520 and 1522 is, as is well known, the only remaining painting by Titian of the two large works he had painted for Brescia. In the context of this exhibition that aims to celebrate the works carried out in Brescia by the great master from Cadore, the outstanding work-of-art preserved in one of Brescia’s leading churches helps cement the relationship between the exhibition and the city.

Conversely, in the rooms of Santa Giulia, a video projection will help visitors explore in detail and get a closer view of the five tables of Titian’s polyptych.

THIRD SECTION
Circulation of Models between Brescia and Venice. Devotional Paintings and portraits

The familiarity of the Brescian artists with Titian and the Venetian environment does not only relate to their artistic style, but it is significantly confirmed by the same type of representation, particularly in paintings for private collections.

This topic will be approached by presenting different types of paintings: the sacred conversation with half-length figures, portrays of worshippers in prayer, and other portraits. Regarding the latter genre, the exhibition will present some amazing comparisons between some beautiful Titian’s works kept in Florence and Vienna and some contemporary works by Brescian painters.

FOURTH SECTION
Naturalistic Vocation of Brescian Painters

The exhibition aims to highlight the influence exerted by Titian on Brescian artists, as well as to stress the autonomy and grandeur of Brescia’s painting school, which stood out for its strong naturalistic vocation. A whole section of the exhibition is actually focused on showcasing this aspect of 16th century painting in Brescia, through some works documenting the painters’ specialization in representing light and Moretto’s and Savoldo’s marked attention to  ‘realistic settings’. Their work is a fundamental precedent to Caravaggio’s art.

FIFTH SECTION
Titian and the decoration of Salone della Loggia

This section is dedicated to the big paintings in the Loggia palace. It will illustrate the story of this major publicly commissioned work, whose only traces can be found in an engraving by Cornelis Cort taken from one of Titian’s lost works, the Vulcan’s Forge (Allegory of Arms Manufacturing Brescia), and in a drawing attributed to Anton van Dyck, which faithfully reproduces a preparatory study by Titian for a second canvas of the cycle depicting the Apotheosis of Brescia between Mars and Minerva. In turn, this will give the opportunity to remember other times in the decoration of Palazzo del Loggia, as well as the building’s expansion projects, in which also Andrea Palladio was involved.

SIXTH SECTION
After Titian. Brescian Patrons of Veronese, Bassano and Venetian Mannerism Masters

The last section of the exhibition will show the works performed for the Brescian area, after Titian departure, by some leading Venetian Mannerism painters, like Paolo Veronese and Francesco Bassano.

Click here for more info about the 6 sections of the exhibition
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